Three Steps to Crafting a Wow-Worthy Facebook Group Introduction

three-steps-to-crafting-a-wow-worthy-facebook-group-introduction

I’ve only recently become privy to the magic of Facebook groups. Now, I’m not saying err’ybody should go jump into a million groups and expect to instantly become famous and successful, but for me, hanging out in the ol’ FB groups makes total sense. There are so many entrepreneurs out in Facebook-group-world who feel completely lost when it comes to business and marketing strategy, and that’s where I actually kind of have my shit together.

[Still looking for inspiration for when 2017 strikes? Here, try this.]

Anywho, back to the story. So, I’m in my first serious Facebook group, ready to introduce myself. The intro prompt said something like, “Welcome, Kayla, Tom, Joe, Harry, blah blah blah. Introduce us to your business, and what you do.”

And then I caught myself writing this…

“I’ve spent the last six years living and breathing content marketing through various marketing- and communications-focused roles across a range of mid-sized companies.”

And then I fell asleep, reading my own words. Seriously, my own words nearly put me to sleep. And I’m usually freakin’ good at words.

Ok, better than the average, everyday Facebook-group introduction? Sure. But SUPER un-compelling. SUPER boring. So I took a step back. I thought about what I’d tell a client, if they told me,

“I’ve been asked to introduce myself to a Facebook group in a few words ( the online equivalent to 10 seconds). What should I say?”

When I came at it from that angle, I was able to spin up something a little bit stronger, a little bit more attention-grabbing, and a lot more meaningful. The steps looked something like this, even though as I was crafting my little intro statement, they felt less like steps and more like word vomit.

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1. Thank your introductory contact for the opportunity to introduce yourself

This is easy. If the good people are willing enough to give you the stage, you better be thankin’ the good people for that stage. Give your introducer a shout out. This is an especially good idea/gesture of small-business solidarity when your intro is happening on Facebook, where your shout out = a tag = traffic to your stage-setter’s page or profile.

2. Instead of telling your audience what you do, tell them why you do it.

I’m sure what you do is supremely interesting and important, and I’m equally sure you provide loads of value to your clients. But, I guarantee that why you do what you do is even more interesting, particularly to people who aren’t convinced to work with you yet.

Owning your “why” and laying it out there for everyone to see is what will set you apart from other makers, doers, photographers, philanthropists, leaders, marketers, etc. who – at least appear to – provide the same service you do. Use a Facebook group introduction as your opportunity to start telling your audience your story. Give them just enough of a peek into your personality and your story to pique their interest in learning more about you and the services/products you provide.

[As if you need more convincing that authenticity is the way to go…]

3. Explicitly tell readers what to do next.

If we’ve met, you know I’m a hard proponent of using calls to action in all content you put out into the world, and Facebook intros are no exception. While you have their attention, make it easy for readers to take the logical next step. Maybe that’s asking them to ‘like’ your Facebook page, maybe it’s telling them to sign up for your newsletter, maybe it’s simply asking them to check out your Etsy shop.

Take your reader by the hand, and pull them towards the next step you want them to take.

[Speaking of ‘next steps,’ have you signed up for my weekly newsletter yet?]

Some examples? Sure, steal some inspiration!

Facebook introduction for the marketing/content guru:

Thanks for the warm welcome, [@Introducer]! I’m a copywriter and marketing guru who lives at the intersection of creativity, strategy, content, and data. My focus is on content because I know the impact a well-thought-out, intentional marketing strategy rooted in content can have on a business’s – or even a personal brand’s – success. Enough about me, I’d love to learn a little bit more about you. Reply to this comment with one question you have about marketing or content strategy – and remember, there’s no such thing as a dumb question!

Facebook introduction for the photographer:

Thanks for setting the stage, [@Introducer]! I started capturing real-life weddings a few years ago, because I felt like the professional photos filling my Facebook feed from friends’ weddings were missing an element of real-ness. My goal, with each couple I work with, is to capture exactly who they are, so when they look back at their wedding photos 5, 10, or 50 years from now, they remember the best day of their lives exactly as it was. If you’re into authenticity, I’d love for you to head on over to my page and give me a like, @Kayla Leverton Photography.

Facebook introduction for the business coach:

Hats off to you for leading this group, [@Introducer]! I’m a business and strategy coach who’s spent the last 8 years knee-deep in corporate America.

This year, I’ve learned that the big-business lessons I’ve learned thus far in my corporate career are just as relevant to small businesses, and applying those lessons to help small-business owners like you is what fires me up. My mission is to use what I’ve learned to help as many people, professionals, and business owners as I can build lives, careers, and businesses they absolutely love.

If that sounds like something you could get into, definitely subscribe to my weekly newsletter to receive a curated digest of content that will push you closer to building the brand, business, and life you love.

Alright, your turn. I’d love for you to leave a comment below with a link to or an example of a wow-worthy Facebook group introduction you’ve crafted for yourself.

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What Would Happen if you Focused 2017 on Making More Room for ‘Yes’?

what-would-happen-if-you-focused-2017-on-making-more-room-for-yes

I can’t help but get a little nostalgic, sentimental, philosophical – whatever you want to call it – this time of year. I think that’s normal, right? Don’t you find yourself in serious reflection mode, thinking back to all the things you got right – and maybe even some of those things you got not-so-right – over this past year?

I totally do. And, without fail, I also find myself promising the coming year will be the best one yet, resolving to fill 2017 with bigger goals, greater aspirations, and stronger intentions. So far, I’ve been right on. Each year gets better and better (knock on ALL of the wood).

I think about what I want this next year to look like, and I have to believe I’m not the only one painting a picture that looks something like mine. For solidarity’s sake, let’s paint this picture together. Whaddya say? Are you up for committing to these three intentions with me?

Intention #1 for 2017: Making (and being happy with) steady progress.

intention-1-for-2017-making-and-being-happy-with-steady-progress

When I reflect on my mindset throughout 2016, one feeling that rises to the surface is disappointment. Not serious disappointment, but twinges of disappointment nonetheless. I think I’ve maybe been listening to one too many podcasts about self-made millionaires and ignoring the parts where they talk about real life and how hard they actually struggled to get to where they are.

I’ve heard every successful entrepreneur say over and over again that the notion of an overnight success is completely ridiculous. Even so, I somehow still expected (ok fine, expect) it to be easy. I am a smart, capable woman. Build it and they shall come – that’s a thing, right? (Wrong.)

What I learned this year is that having the qualities it takes to be successful is just one (itty bitty) part of the formula. The other, bigger, more important part of that formula is leveraging those qualities to create success. If you want to be successful, you have to use your best qualities and grow your worst. You have to use those qualities and push yourself harder than you have ever before.

Intention #2 for 2017: Living in and for the Present.

intention-2-for-2017-living-in-and-for-the-present

This is a big year. Not only does 2017 have some serious potential professionally speaking, it’s also the year I get to make the biggest promise of my whole entire life and marry my favorite human.

Fiancé Ben proposed last September, and I remember thinking then that two years was AN ETERNITY in engagement years. But here we are, over a year later, and I can’t believe how close September 9th feels.

I’m guilty of falling into a silly little trap. Instead of focusing on the purpose, the point, and the present, I’ve allowed wedding planning to morph into another monstrous to-do list. I’m going to fight that urge these next 9 months, though. Focused on the here and now, I’m going to do my best to soak up every second of planning this day, good, bad, ugly, for better and for worse.

I like to think I’ll be successful in applying this practice to other aspects of my life too. Personally, professionally, and everywhere in between, let’s try not to take any of the moments 2017 throws our way for granted, shall we?

Intention #3 for 2017: Creating room for ‘Yes’.

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I think this one’s most important. If you decide to jump on just one of these intention bandwagons, please oh please pick this one.

When I reflect on 2016 – or even 2015, 2010, or any year before, in between, or after – the very best moments have stemmed from a simple ‘Yes’. My biggest growth spurts have happened in that awkward space that sits just outside my comfort zone. My very favorite moments and the successes I’m most proud of have happened when I’ve pushed myself to the edge of where I thought my ability to say ‘Yes’ ended. Here’s to doing more of that.

This year, I resolve to make room for more yesses. I’ll be quicker to see possibilities and slower to jump to nay-saying conclusions. Open to new experiences, and closed to judging people, places, or situations at face value.

What do you think? What do you think could happen if you join me in making 2017 the year of ‘Yes’?

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